Developmental Psychopathology Lab Home

1. Pathways to Antisocial Behavior

2. Temperament and Parenting

3. Evidence-based Assessments

Tests and Measures

People

Contact Information

 

 

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University of New Orleans
Department of Psychology
Geology/Psychology Bldg Lakefront Campus
2000 Lakeshore Drive
New Orleans, LA 70148

Phone: (504) 280-6291
Fax: (504) 280-6049

 

3. Major Lines of Research:
Enhancing the assessment and diagnosis of childhood disorders

Another focus of research in the Developmental Psychopathology Lab is using  research to enhance the practice of assessment and diagnosis of childhood psychopathology.   The practice of psychological assessment has often been driven more by an allegiance to a theoretical orientation that underlies a particular method of assessment, or even more problematic, by an allegiance to a particular assessment technique, rather than being based on the most current understanding of the psychological construct that is being assessed.  This has led to a dichotomy between measures of psychopathology being used in research and assessment techniques being used in clinical practice.  If the field is to improve its treatment technology by being guided by advances in basic research, it is critical to translate measures that are being developed and used in research into forms that can also be used in practice.    Therefore, a continuing focus of the lab is to apply its research findings to enhancing the science and technology of assessment of childhood psychopathology.

Childs, K., Frick, P.J., Ryals, J.S., Lingonblad, A., & Villio, M.J.  (2014).  A comparison of empirically based and structured professional judgment estimation of risk using the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY).  Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 12, 40-57.

Barry, C.T., Golmaryami, F.N., Rivera-Hudson, N., & Frick, P.J.  (2013). Evidence-based assessment of conduct disorder: Current considerations and preparation for DSM-5.  Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 44, 56-63.

Frick, P.J. & Nigg, J.T. (2012). Current issues in the diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 8, 77-107.

Frick, P.J., Barry, C.T., & Kamphaus, R.W. (2010). Clinical assessment of children’s personality and behavior, (3rd edition).  New York:  Springer.

Kieling, C., Kieling, R., Rohde, L.A., Frick, P.J., Moffitt, T., Nigg, J.T., Tannock, R., & Castellanos, F.X. (2010). The age of onset of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.  American Journal of Psychiatry,  167. 14-16.

Pardini, D.A., Frick, P.J., & Moffitt, T.E.  (2010). Building an evidence base for DSM-5 conceptualizations of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder:  Introduction to the special section. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 119, 683-688.

Frick, P.J. (2009). Extending the construct of psychopathy to youths:  Implications for understanding, diagnosing, and treating antisocial children and adolescents.  Canadian Journal of Psychiatry ,12, 803-812.

White, S.F., Cruise, K.R., & Frick, P.J. (2009). Differential correlates to self-report and parent-report of callous-unemotional traits in a sample of juvenile sex offenders. Behavioral Science and the Law, 27, 910-928.

Barry, C.T., Frick, P.J., & Grafeman, S.J. (2008). Child versus parent reports of parenting practices:  Implications for the conceptualization of child behavioral and emotional problems.  Assessment, 15, 294-303.

Frick, P.J. (2000). Laboratory and performance-based measures of childhood disordersJournal of Clinical Child Psychology, 29, 475-478.

Frick, P.J., Lahey, B.B., Applegate, B., Kerdyck, L., Ollendick, T., Hynd, G.W., Garfinkel, B., Greenhill, L., Biederman, J., Barkley, R.A., McBurnett, K., Newcorn, J., & Waldman, I. (1994). DSM-IV field trials for the disruptive behavior disorders: Use of symptom utility estimates. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 33, 529-539

 

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Updated: 12/02/2014